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Young Liberals

Young Liberals of Canada in Saanich Gulf Islands and Southern Vancouver Island

Your Liberal Party of Canada in Saanich-Gulf Islands Young Liberal Representative is Justin Bedi. You may contact Justin by e-mail at youth@teamsgi.ca

President of the Young Liberals in British ColumbiaBraeden Caley

Structure

The YLC mirrors the structure of the Liberal Party of Canada. There are Provincial and Territorial Organizations, which administer themselves according to their own bylaws. There is also a National Executive that runs the affairs of the entire YLC.

Within the National Executive there are Table Officers with specific portfolios that do not fall within the jurisdiction of a particular Province or Territory.

The National Executive of the YLC is outlined in bylaw 3 of the constitution, found on the YLC website in the “Documents” section. The YLC National Director is the only full time employee of the YLC, but does not sit on the National Executive.

FAQ

This document has been written to answer the most frequently asked questions of potential and actual young liberals. Because there are a wide variety of common questions, this booklet is of considerable length. In order to maximize its benefits, it may be advantageous to skim the entire text for the questions that are of particular interest to you.

We have divided the questions into six categories, which are as follows:

Getting Started
Relation to the Liberal Party
Structure of the Liberal Party of Canada
Policy
Finances
International

The YLC hopes that the addition of this FAQ to your library benefits your knowledge of the Young Liberals of Canada. The more that you know about our organization, the better equipped you will be to use the tools we offer to your advantage. Please take some time to better acquaint yourself with the Young Liberals of Canada.

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Getting Started

1. How do I become involved with the Young Liberals of Canada (YLC)?

All members of the Liberal Party, who are aged 25 and under, are members of the Commission of the Young Liberals, as it is written in the constitutional by-laws of the Liberal Party of Canada . You can become directly involved with the YLC if you join a post secondary school club or Riding Association of the YLC. Provincial offices administer all membership forms to clubs and associations.

2. How much does it cost to join the YLC?

It costs $5.00 annually to be a member of the Young Liberals. Membership with a post secondary school club or Riding Association gives you full potential privileges of that club, your Provincial Young Liberals, the National Young Liberals and of the Liberal Party of Canada.

3. How big is the YLC?

The Young Liberals of Canada has 155 Post-Secondary Institution Young Liberal clubs throughout the country. We also have a presence in nearly every one of Canada’s 301 ridings. It has been estimated that the YLC has nearly 60-80 000 members at various periods.

4. Can I actually make a difference if I become involved with the YLC?

Yes! The YLC is committed to empowering the ideas and energy of its members. The more that you put into the YLC, the more that you will get back. While the YLC can provide you with a structure to bring forth new and innovative ideas, we need your time and effort to bring positive change to our organization, our party, and our provinces, territories, and country. The best way to make a difference is to get involved in your local post-secondary school club or Young Liberal Riding Association. Each club or association sends delegates to conferences, Annual General Meetings, and Biannual meetings. Each club or association also has the ability to bring forth new policies (Refer to Policy Section of the FAQ). The YLC is an active and dynamic organization. And, being approximately one third of the Liberal Party, the YLC is in a very good position to make a difference.

5. What are the YLC’s Constitutional Principles?

The YLC’s principles can be found in the preamble of its constitutional by-laws (the YLC bylaws can be found online at www.youngliberals.ca). To summarize, the YLC believes in the rights, freedoms, and unity of all people, the chance for all people to advance economically, the importance of a healthy environment, and the responsibility of Young Canadians to be politically involved in order to advance Canada in the world, both socially and politically. The YLC believes in constant change toward the betterment of the Young Liberals, the Liberal Party, and of Canada as a whole.

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Relation to the Liberal Party

1. What is the difference between the Young Liberals of Canada (YLC) and the Liberal Party of Canada?

The YLC is one of four Commissions established in by-law 4 of the Constitution of the Liberal Party of Canada (the LPC by-laws can be found online at www.liberal.ca). The other three commissions are the National Women’s Liberal Commission, the Aboriginal Peoples’ Commission, and the Seniors’ Commission. Each Commission promotes the views and interests of its members within the Liberal Party. The Commission of the Young Liberal of Canada, therefore, promotes the perspectives, policies, and ideas of Liberal members who have not yet celebrated their 26th birthday. It is not a separate entity from the Liberal Party, but is rather a part of it.

2. Does the YLC always agree with the Liberal Party of Canada?

No! The YLC does not have to always agree with the Liberal Party of Canada. In fact, the YLC often pushes the larger membership of the Liberal Party to adopt new policies that may be viewed as too radical or challenging. In order for the YLC to promote and push a policy for the entire Liberal Party to adopt, it must be an official YLC policy, properly adopted at a Policy Convention. Therefore, The YLC and Liberal Party of Canada often do not agree, or have not passed the same resolutions, at any given time.

3. Can I get in trouble if I don’t agree with everything that the Liberal Party of Canada does and/or stands for?

No! Taking out membership in the Liberal Party of Canada should engage you in trying to make changes within the Party. Both the YLC and the Liberal Party of Canada require people to be constantly adding and modifying what it stands for. Much of the Liberal Party’s success has been its ability to embrace and welcome new ideas. Change is one of the founding principles of the Liberal Party of Canada.

4. Am I allowed to disagree with the official position of the YLC?

Yes! Similar to the previous answer, the YLC does not expect nor desire all of its members to agree on all issues. We are a democratic organization that requires diversity of ideas and opinion in order to be successful. We want you to be an active and distinct member of our organization so that we may provide the best possible initiatives for the Liberal Party and the most qualified choice to Canadians.

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Structure of the Young Liberals of Canada

1. How is the Young Liberals of Canada (YLC) structured?

The YLC mirrors the structure of the Liberal Party of Canada. There are Provincial and Territorial Organizations, which administer themselves according to their own bylaws. There is also a National Executive that runs the affairs of the entire YLC. Within the National Executive there are Table Officers with specific portfolios that do not fall within the jurisdiction of a particular Province or Territory. The National Executive of the YLC is outlined in bylaw 3 of the constitution.

2. How would I become a part of the YLC National Executive?

To become a part of the YLC National Executive you have to either be elected to one of the Table Officer positions at a biannual convention of the Liberal Party of Canada, be elected as president or be the designate of a president of one of the provincial or territorial organizations, or a YLC representative on a standing committee of the Liberal Party of Canada.

3. What is a Table Officer of the YLC?

Table Officers compose the core of the National Executive and hold specified portfolio positions. Article 6 of the YLC constitution outlines the responsibilities and definitions of each Table Officer position (the YLC bylaws can be found online at www.youngliberals.ca).

4. What are the roles and responsibilities of the National Director of the YLC?

Under Article 7 of the YLC Constitution, the National Director has the role and responsibility to be on staff at the office of the Liberal Party of Canada, to facilitate all executive members in executing their duties, to act as a liaison with LPC staff, and to assist in the organizing of any affairs related to the YLC (the YLC bylaws can be found online at www.youngliberals.ca). For most of the year, the National Director is the only paid staff of the YLC and is responsible for creating and distributing the recruitment package, answering information requests, assisting in the organizing of special events and conventions, and arbitrating conflict situations within YLC clubs and members.

5. What role do provincial and territorial organizations play in the YLC?

The YLC is a federation of provincial and territorial organizations. Each provincial or territorial organization is responsible for post-secondary school and riding association clubs. Each is also responsible for liaising with the provincial or territorial Liberal Parties and for sitting on the National Executive of the YLC.

6. Are all provincial and territorial organizations structured the same?

No! Each provincial and territorial organization is structured according to their own constitutional bylaws. A copy of each constitution is kept in the office of the Liberal Party of Canada.

7. Where do University and College clubs fit into the YLC?

Post-secondary school clubs are organized and run by provincial or territorial organizations and must be accredited by the National Executive of the YLC. Each accredited club may send delegates, with voting rights, to provincial, territorial, and/or national conventions and conferences for both the YLC and the Liberal Party of Canada.

8. Can I start a YLC Club at my High School?

No, we do not currently have clubs in high schools. However, you can contact the YLC National Director to get information about a YLC club in your riding (ylc-jlc@liberal.ca).

9. What does it mean to be an accredited club?

The national executive of the YLC has to approve each club that exists. Accredited clubs enjoy full benefits of membership within the YLC and the Liberal Party of Canada and can send delegates to conventions and conferences of both at a provincial, territorial, and/or national level. Without accreditation, a club may not participate in such conventions and conferences.

10. How many University and College clubs are there?

Currently we have 155 University and College Young Liberal clubs.

11. How would I start up a new University or College club?

Before you try to set up a post-secondary school club it is important to make sure that there isn’t one that already exists and is accredited. In order to find this out, you should contact the National Director at the office of the Liberal Party of Canada (613-237-0740, info@liberal.ca). If a club does not exist, then you may proceed.

12. Can there be more than one post-secondary school club at the same institution?

Yes, under one condition. The only way that a post-secondary school institution may have more than one club of the YLC is if the institution has more than one campus and each campus is further than 1 kilometer from the other campuses. Under this condition, a single institution may have more than one accredited campus club.

13. Can I be a part of more than one YLC club?

No. Under YLC rules and regulations, you may only be a member of a single club.

14. Can I be a member of a YLC club and a Liberal riding association at the same time?

Yes. One does not exclude the other.

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Policy

1. Is the official policy of the Young Liberals of Canada (YLC) the same as official policy for the Liberal Party of Canada?

No. As explained above, the YLC does not have the same official policy as the Liberal Party of Canada, though a lot of it may overlap. In fact, the YLC often pushes the larger membership of the Liberal Party to adopt new policies that may be viewed as too radical or challenging. In order for the YLC to promote and push a policy for the entire Liberal Party to adopt, it must be an official YLC policy, properly adopted at a Policy Convention. Therefore, The YLC and Liberal Party of Canada often do not agree, or have not passed the same resolutions, at any given time.

2. How do I change or bring forward a policy initiative?

If you have a policy idea, the best way to bring it forward is to present it to your club or association so that together you can refine and modify it. Once your club is satisfied with the proposal, and it is adopted, it can then be considered by delegates attending the next provincial Young Liberal policy conference. Each Young Liberal provincial and territorial association are asked to submit three priority resolutions and any number of auxiliary resolutions to the YLC for consideration at the YLC National Policy Convention (For more details, please refer to the Policy Maker Handbook, which can be found online at www.youngliberals.ca under the Policy Section).

3. Once the Young Liberals have adopted a policy resolution, what happens?

The YLC is asked to submit three priority resolutions and any number of auxiliary resolutions at the Biannual National Convention of the Liberal Party of Canada. Therefore, the delegates at the National Young Liberal Policy Convention must vote on which of the passed policy resolutions will be the three priority resolutions. The resolutions that are passed, but not sent as priority resolutions, will be submitted as auxiliary resolutions. After these submissions have been made, the entire Liberal Party of Canada will discuss them at the Biannual National Conference. It is rare for auxiliary motions to be discussed (For more details, please refer to the Policy Maker Handbook, which can be found online at www.youngliberals.ca under the Policy Section).